Religious Education

Lectio Divina

Lectio Divina is a slow, contemplative praying of the Scriptures. We can attend "with the ear of our hearts" to our own memories, listening for God's presence in the events of our lives. We experience Christ reaching out to us through our own experiences and memories as they connect with Scripture.

Praying Scripture

How to Practice Lectio Divina

  • Choose a text of the Scriptures that you wish to pray. Many Christians use in their daily lectio divina one of the readings from the eucharistic liturgy for the day (www.usccb.org/nab); others prefer to slowly work through a particular book of the Bible.
  • Place yourself in a comfortable position and allow yourself to become silent. Sometimes it helps to focus on breathing in order to relax. For some, the practice known as "centering prayer" makes a good, brief introduction to lectio divina. Use whatever method is best for you and allow yourself to enjoy silence for a few moments.
  • Lectio DivinaLectio (Read): Turn to the text and read it slowly, gently. Savor each portion of the reading, constantly listening for the "still, small voice" of a word or phrase that somehow says, "I am for you today." Which word or phrase does your mind keep coming back to? Which seems to resonate with something in your life today? In lectio divina, God does not reach out and grab us; rather, he gently invites us ever more deeply into his presence.
  • Meditatio (Reflect): Take the word or phrase into yourself. Read the text again with this word or phrase in mind. "Chew on it" and consider how it might apply to your life right now. Do not be afraid of distractions. These memories or thoughts are often connected to what God is saying to you through this Scripture.
  • Oratio (Respond): Speak to God. Whether you use words, ideas, or images--or all three--is not important. Talk to God about what you have discovered during your experience of meditation. Give to God what you have found within your heart, and pray in thanksgiving or in need for what you have discovered.
  • Contemplatio (Rest): Rest in God's embrace. This is a freeing of oneself from one's own thoughts, both mundane and holy, and hearing God talk to us. Open your mind, heart, and soul to the influence of
  • God. Learn to use words when words are helpful, and to let go of words when they no longer are necessary. Feel God's presence with you.
Bibie

Sometimes in lectio divina, you may return several times to the printed text, either to savor the literary context of the word or phrase that God has given or to seek a new word or phrase to ponder. At other times, only a single word or phrase will fill the whole time set aside for lectio divina. It is not necessary to assess anxiously the quality of your lectio divina, as if you were "performing" or seeking some goal. Lectio divina has no goal other than that of being in the presence of God by praying the Scriptures. Some people find that journaling is a helpful way to focus the prayer of lectio divina.

 

Give it a try today with the Gospel Reading for this Sunday's Mass!

Faith Formation Volunteer Opportunities

A quote from the U.S. Bishops

This passage (Lk 24:13-35) offers us a model for our ministry and shows the need we all have for ongoing formation in faith. For in it we see two adult disciples who, encountering the risen Lord, grow stronger in love, knowledge, commitment, and zeal. As then, today, "Those who are already disciples of Jesus Christ. ..[need] to be constantly nourished by the word of God so that they may grow in their Christian life. Such lifelong formation is always needed and must be a priority in the Church's catechetical ministry; moreover, it must "be considered the chief form of catechesis. All the other forms, which are indeed always necessary, are in some way oriented to it." (Our Hearts Were Burning Within us - par. 12-13)

There are a variety of volunteer roles that need to be filled in order to best serve our parish in catechesis and faith formation.  Please take some time to look through the below list of volunteer roles and discern how you might be called to serve in this ministry.

 

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How to Pray the Rosary

 
praying the rosary
 Introduction

The Rosary is divided into five decades. Each decade represents a mystery or event in the life of Jesus. There are four sets of "Mysteries of the Rosary" (Joyful, Luminous, Sorrowful, and Glorious). These four "Mysteries of the Rosary" therefore contain, a total of twenty mysteries. The Joyful, Luminous, Sorrowful, and Glorious Mysteries are then said on specific days of the week (see each set of mysteries below). During private recitation of the Rosary, each decade requires  meditation on a specific mystery. Public recitation of the Rosary (two or more people), requires a leader to announce each of the mysteries before the decade, and start each prayer (see "The Family Rosary" below).

The Apostle's Creed is said on the Crucifix; the Our Father is said on each of the Large Beads; the Hail Mary is said on each of the Small Beads; the Glory Be after the three Hail Mary's at the beginning of the Rosary, and after each decade of Small Beads. In June 13, 1917, Our Lady asked that an additional prayer be added after each decade of the Rosary (see prayers at the end of this document). It is a prayer of forgiveness to Jesus and is said following the Glory Be after each decade only.

 

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Sacraments

 

The sacraments are physical signs which impart real, sacramental grace to transform lives with the power of the Holy Spirit. They are means of encounter with Christ himself. It is Christ who welcomes the newly baptized into the family of God and Confirms his faithful through the gift of the Holy Spirit in Confirmation. In the Eucharist Christ nourishes his flock with his own Body and Blood, and he heals and strengthens them with Reconciliation and Anointing of the Sick. Through the sacraments of Holy Matrimony and Holy Orders, Christ supplies for the needs of his Church on earth. All the seven sacraments come from the ministry of Christ and continue his work of healing, strengthening and forgiving sins.

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Sacraments (2)

 

The sacraments are physical signs which impart real, sacramental grace to transform lives with the power of the Holy Spirit. They are means of encounter with Christ himself. It is Christ who welcomes the newly baptized into the family of God and Confirms his faithful through the gift of the Holy Spirit in Confirmation. In the Eucharist Christ nourishes his flock with his own Body and Blood, and he heals and strengthens them with Reconciliation and Anointing of the Sick. Through the sacraments of Holy Matrimony and Holy Orders, Christ supplies for the needs of his Church on earth. All the seven sacraments come from the ministry of Christ and continue his work of healing, strengthening and forgiving sins.

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